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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
the three-day trip. she's likely going to press for better ties between india and pakistan, right next door. that relationship has been shaky for some time. clinton will also focus on economic ties. as you know, india has a $1.6 trillion economy. it's quite vital for india and the u.s. to have good economic relationships. >> big economy and a growing economy. thanks very much, check in with you later. >>> carter evans live here in new york. he's at the nasdaq market site. good to see you, how are futures shaping up? we look to big news from wall street. wall street's got to deal with earnings and debt ceiling stuff this week. >> overall, heading into this week, considering all of that our futures right now are a little bit lower. many of the biggest and wealthiest companies in this country are preparing to release quarterly numbers. we'll hear from general electric, goldman sachs, intel, ibm, a handful of the companies investor ises are keep an eye on. we'll get an idea how some of the biggest companies in the country are doing in the third quarter. today we're going to hear from charles sc
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
were traveling to pakistan, then they came back to the uk. the worry is that america has similar challenges and parallels. >> and apparently according to some reports i saw today, that's exactly what osama bin laden was hoping for, targeting specifically somalia and members of al shabaab to do just that, attack the u.s. according to u.s. officials, al qaeda is on the brink of collapse. if that happens, what other groups, what other factions would be ready to step in and fill the void? is that even what would happen? >> transnational terrorism has diversified. it's no longer about one group. bin laden's ideology has po live rated since 9/11. there are outfits who have their own resources, leadership, cell strauk chur, design and commitment to plot and commitment transnational attacks. one leading element has been the al qaeda franchise in yemen that has tried to target the united states over the last few year, especially going after the aviation industry. al shabaab which is next door in somalia is another group that's concerning. and the worry is that at some point al shabaab may
-qaida operatives still plot and plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground, still intimidate and still assassinate as we just saw this past week about the brutal killing of president karzai's brother. hamid karzai trying to climb into his brother's grave last week is facing almost daily challenges to his rule. his brother was assassinated by a trusted bodyguard. a former governor and loyal political adviser to karzai was assassinate ned his apartment by two taliban gunman wearing bomb belts. >> in crushing heat and in numbing cold from the deserts of southern afghanistan to the peaks of the behind due kush. you have shown initiative, determination, innovative necessary and courage. you have been diplomats as well as warriors, statesman as well as soldiers. your performance as been in a word awesome. >> reporter: general petraeus handed over his command to marine general john allen. petraeus will retire from the army and particular over as the head of the cia in september. >> there will be tough days ahead. and i have no illusions about the challenges we will
bin laden's pakistan hideout in may. in it, u.s. officials say it found documents bin laden wanted to attack the united states on the 10th anniversary of 9/11. plans included including general petraeus and shooting down air force one or the helicopter with a missile or rocket grenade. other documents show bin laden was pushing for a stronger terrorist presence in europe. >>> bp hopes to win become the confidence of federal regulators. it will impose new safety standards at drilling projects in the gulf of mexico. the safety measures exceed federal requirements. bp pledges better supervision and improved drilling practices aimed at preventing blowouts like the one in april of last year. the explosion killed 11 rig workers and released nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the gulf. >>> in our economy watch in morning, we're learning more about the takeover deal targeting oakland based clorox. billionaire carl icon announced yesterday he is offering $10.2 billion for the company. however he feels he shouldn't, the only bidder for clorox. he said shop around it get the best deal.
knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border against troops down in the southern region. it's those southern and eastern regions of afghanistan that have experienced some of the highest levels of attacks. and this all comes at a very interesting time. we're seeing a hand over of seven key areas across the country to afghan security force. as those hand overs have taken place we've seen an uptick in attacks and assassination attempts, and successful attempts at that. half brother of president karzai was killed last week as well as a senior advisor to him earlier this week. so, again, a critical time here in afghanistan, and allegations of a hacking by the taliban. >> david, good to see you. thank you very much. we'll keep on top of the story with you. >>> close to now a dozen declared gop presidential candidates now but still many voters are asking who else have you got? a lot of republicans, especially those on the christian right are saying they want texas govern
about fraud in afghanisn, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are notaying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9 and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illinois
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)